DIAL COVER REPLACEMENTS



Solutions to your missing or damaged glass and plastic dial covers.

 

I CAN PROVIDE A KIT OF THE IDEAL WOOD FOR MOLDS, PROTECTED PLASTIC AND
A SHEET OF INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING YOUR OWN PLASTIC DIAL COVERS.

 THESE DIAL COVERS ARE THE SAME AS THE ONES I MADE OVER 5000 OF BEFORE MY STROKE.  NO VACUUM DEVICE IS REQUIRED, THE PLASTIC IS NOT OF THE TYPE NORMALLY AVAILABLE FROM
HOBBY STORES FOR THE MAKING OF COCKPITS AND SUCH.  THE INSTRUCTIONS ARE
COMPLETE IN EVERY WAY.

 THE KIT CONSISTS OF SIX PIECES OF PLASTIC 6 1/2"
x 6 1/2", SIX PIECES OF  FIVE PLY PLYWOOD 6 1/2" X 6 1/2" AND A PAGE OF INSTRUCTIONS WHICH ARE THE RESULT OF PRODUCING OVER 5000 PLASTIC DIALCOVERS OVER THE PAST YEARS.  MY STROKE HAS LEFT IT IMPOSSIBLE FOR ME TO CONTINUE MAKING THEM FOR YOU.  POSTAGE IS INCLUDED IN THE PRICE AS IS NORMAL FOR ALL MY PROJECTS.

 PRICE FOR THE KIT IS $20.00 OR ABOUT
$3.00 PER UNIT.

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Due to many requests for a kit which includes materials for larger dial covers I am now offering a LARGE KIT with three (3) 11 x 11 inch pieces of the correct plastic and three pieces of mold material (plywood).  Same price as above.  Please specify which kit you need when ordering.

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MOLDED PLASTIC DIAL COVERS
Here is my technique used for making dial covers

This kit contains the special dial cover plastic with protective film on each side and 1/4" Baltic Birch five-ply plywood to make the molds.  Depending on the kit size you will have six sheets of 6-1/2" square plastic and plywood or three sheets of 11" square plastic and plywood.  In addition to this you will need a jig saw (scroll saw) using a .018" x .100"wide sawblade having 15 teeth per inch.

To begin remove the old dial cover and clean out the dial opening of any remaining cover pieces or dirt.  Make a transfer pattern of the dial opening in order to make a mold.  Take a piece of cardboard or heavy paper and place it inside the cabinet.  Hold it tightly against the front and trace an outline of the inside of the dial opening.

Now that you have the pattern drawn, cut it out along the tracing line starting from the outside edge of the sheet and cut in to the line.  Save the inner part that you cut out and discard the leftover surrounding piece.  Try the pattern to check its size and shape against the hole in the radio.  Verify that the pattern fits easily inside the opening without binding and that it matches the shape.

The finished mold will consist of two parts, an inner solid piece the size and shape of the dial cover and an outer sheet with a hole  matching the inner mold.  For the mold, use a sheet of the 1/4" plywood.  Place the previously made paper/cardboard pattern in the center of the plywood and draw a line around the outside of it.  Cut out both halves of the mold in one operation saving both the 'hole' and the surrounding piece.  Start at the outside edge of the plywood and cut in towards the outlined area.  When you reach the outlined area cut along the center of the line all the way around then remove the piece from the inside.

After you cut out the mold, lightly sand the edges with sandpaper or 3M sanding sponge to smooth out and straighten any rough areas while being careful not to bevel the edges too much.  The finished dial will closely match the shape and and surface of the inner mold much like stretching a balloon over a book.  If the dial cover should have a smooth rounded edge then smooth out the edges of the mold to the desired shape matching the original cover.

Cut out a piece of plastic at least an inch larger on all sides than the old dial cover.  You can trim it to actual size after it has been molded.  Before you place the plastic on the mold you should smooth out any wrinkles in the protective film covering the plastic.  Stack the parts starting with a piece of plywood as a base a little bit larger than the mold parts.  Place the inner mold in the center of the base and center the plastic on top of it.  Place the outer mold on top of the plastic sheet and center the hole over the inner mold below.

Preheat your oven to 250 degrees F.  When the oven is ready put the mold stack in and allow it to heat for 8 to 10 minutes.  Wear gloves and remove the stack from the oven.  Place the mold on a sturdy flat surface.  Press down on the outer mold forcing the plastic film down over the inner mold until the outer mold is flat against the base.  Use spring clamps to hold it together while it cools.  You can put it in the freezer for 5 minutes to cool, if desired.

After the mold is cool take it apart and remove the plastic.  Trim the edges of the dial cover so that it will fit inside the radio or bezel leaving enoungh around the outside edge to attach it to the case as necessary.  Peel away the protective plastic film from the cover.  Place the cover in the opening and secure it with whatever means the manufacturer used.

Thanks to Dan Schoo for this write-up.



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10 each BRASS EYELETS, .056 diameter by 1/8" long.  Perfect for attaching dial covers to metal bezels.  $2.00/pkg 10.

10 each BRASS EYELETS, .071 diameter by 3/16"long.
 Perfect for attaching dial covers to plastic bezels.  $2.00/pkg 10.

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I do not sell any type of printed dials or printed dial glass scales.  Places to check for a replacement would be:

RadioDaze  has a line of printed glass dial scales and now handles the line of decals and plastic dial reproductions formerly done by Rock Sea Enterprises.

Mark Oppat also carries the line of printed dial scales previously produced by Clint Blais
including Zenith, RCA and Philco.

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ROUND  (FLAT) AND CONVEX GLASS DIAL COVERS



I have available convex and flat glass replacements in round only, sorry no oval shapes.  Sizes available range from 2" to 12-1/2" and they come in 1/16" increments so measure accurately before ordering.  Click this link for a listing of what is available.  

First Class Mail postage in the USA is included in the $16.00 price for the glass.  8-inch and greater are $20.00.  If you desire Priority Mail or International Mail please submit the amount for additional postage.



Click on the link to see the items offered

Single-Section Electrolytic Capacitor Replacements

Multisection Electrolytic Capacitor Replacements

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updated 5 April 2011